U.S. OLYMPIC COMMITTEE AND USA SWIMMING ANNOUNCE DISCIPLINARY MEASURES FOR FOUR ATHLETES

Reposted from USA Swimming

The United States Olympic Committee and USA Swimming today jointly announced disciplinary measures for four members of the 2016 U.S. Olympic Swimming Team. Due to violations of each organization’s code of conduct, Gunnar Bentz, Jack Conger, James Feigen and Ryan Lochte have agreed to serve suspensions and forfeit certain rewards and opportunities afforded to members of the U.S. Olympic Team.

The following sanctions have been agreed upon:

Applicable to Ryan Lochte:

 

1.    Suspended from domestic and international USA Swimming national team competitions for 10 months (through June 30, 2017), including the 2017 National Championships, which renders him ineligible for the 2017 FINA World Championships.
2.    During the suspension, no monthly stipend from USA Swimming or the USOC.
3.    During the suspension, no direct support or access to training centers or other facilities of the USOC.
4.    Forfeits all USOC and USA Swimming medal funding for his gold medal at the 2016 Olympic Games.
5.    Will perform 20 hours of community service.
6.    Not permitted to join Team USA for its White House visit in connection with the Rio 2016 Games.
7.    Not permitted to attend USA Swimming’s annual “Golden Goggles” event in 2016.

Applicable to Gunnar Bentz, Jack Conger and James Feigen:

1.    Suspended from domestic and international USA Swimming national team competitions for four months (through Dec. 31, 2016).
2.    During the suspension, no monthly stipend from USA Swimming or the USOC.
3.    During the suspension, no direct support or access to training centers or other facilities of the USOC.
4.    Not permitted to join Team USA for its White House visit in connection with the Rio 2016 Games.
5.    Not permitted to attend USA Swimming’s annual “Golden Goggles” event in 2016.

Further applicable to Gunnar Bentz due to violating a USA Swimming Olympic Village curfew rule placed on athletes under the age of 21:

1.    Will perform 10 hours of community service.

“As we have said previously, the behavior of these athletes was not acceptable. It unfairly maligned our hosts and diverted attention away from the historic achievements of Team USA,” said USOC CEO Scott Blackmun. “Each of the athletes has accepted responsibility for his actions and accepted the appropriate sanctions. We look forward to focusing our energy on the Paralympic Games and the incredible men and women representing our country in Rio.”

“During an otherwise extraordinary Olympic Games, a small group of athletes had lapses in judgement and conduct that are unacceptable and not consistent with our expectations. When Code of Conduct infractions occur, it’s our responsibility to take action that reflects the seriousness of what happened,” USA Swimming Executive Director Chuck Wielgus said. “Unfortunately, this storyline took attention away from the athletes who deserved it the most. These athletes took accountability for their mistakes and are committed to represent themselves and our country with the great character and distinction we expect.”

The sanctions take effect immediately.

 

We would like to hear what you think, please use the comments to weigh in.

5 thoughts on “U.S. OLYMPIC COMMITTEE AND USA SWIMMING ANNOUNCE DISCIPLINARY MEASURES FOR FOUR ATHLETES

  • Sep 9, 2016 at 2:27 pm
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    Do the sanctions have any impact on Bentz and Conger’s eligibility for NCAA?

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  • Sep 9, 2016 at 4:47 pm
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    This was a slap on the wrist. Suspension from USA Swimming sanctioned events would have been a more fitting punishment.

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  • Sep 9, 2016 at 9:38 pm
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    I agree that this was a slap on the wrist. The disciplinary measures for four athletes were not sufficient, and these individuals should not be representing the USA in the next Olympic games in Tokyo in 2020.
    For some people the main question is if Conger eligible or not for NCAA? However, this question is absolutely irrelevant, especially at this moment. Mr. Conger is an outstanding swimmer, but he is not good member of the US Olympic team. Mr. Conger is real embarrassment for the USA team, and real embarrassment for the NCAP and the PVS local community as well (he was representing NCAP/PV in the US Olympic team trials).

    Four athletes drank behavior in a gas station in Rio was very wrong and not acceptable for the USA team member. However, the next day they were sober (not drank), and they continuously lie to the police and to the Brazilian’ officials who investigated this case. In the USA, lying to a law enforcement officer can result in a criminal conviction. This type of behavior is absolutely unacceptable, especially for the USA team member. This is why I believe that the four individuals should not be representing the USA in the next Olympic games in Tokyo.

    During the Statesman interview Mr. Conger stated: “…I thought I could be in some real trouble here. Then I started to realize I didn’t do anything wrong. I drank a little too much and I urinated behind a gas station. But neither of those things, I don’t really think you should be charged or go to jail for]. This is Mr. Conger’s mentality and attitude. It is hard to add something to his own statement.

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    • Sep 15, 2016 at 1:37 pm
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      Can’t be condoning drank behavior now, can we?

      Reply
  • Sep 16, 2016 at 6:59 pm
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    USA Swimming should define some Standard of Conduct (Code of conduct) for the USA Olympic team member in swimming! Swimming for the USA at the Olympic games is PRIVILEGE, not a right; and it must be some Standard of Conduct, because this is the HUGE HONOR TO REPRESENT THE USA AT THE OLYMPIC GAMES!

    USA Swimming is telling us that such standard does not exist! You may have a criminal-like behavior, smoking marijuana, to have repeated DUI – and everything like that is does not matter and you can represent the USA at the Olympic games. It is a very bad example for the swimming kids!
    There were a very high competition at the US Olympic team trials, and many results were very tight. Lets say Mr. A is faster then Mr. B in 0.01 sec, but he was smoking marijuana, and had repeated DUI. In such circumstances it would be right decision to ask Mr.B to represent the USA at the Olympic games, because this is privilege and honor to represent the USA at the Olympic games. Most importantly, it will be a very correct message for the swimming kids, and many of them have a dream to represent the USA at the Olympic games! Unfortunately, the USA Swimming telling us something opposite – the Standard of Conduct for the USA Olympic team does not exist.

    Reply

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